Tesla Sales Surge In The Netherlands In September

Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla was the 5th most popular of all brands in September.In the Netherlands, just like in Norway, passenger car registrations significantly decreased in September (down by 16.7% to 29,527). It’s explained by delays of certification of WLTP test results for many models that are now required in the European Union.In such circumstances, electric cars shine. Tesla noted 1,645 new registrations in September (5,284 YTD), which was the 5th best brand (ahead of companies like Volkswagen).News from Netherlands Moreover, the Tesla Model S, with 1,052 registrations (3,376 YTD) was the second best-selling model for the month (3.6% market share)! First place went to Opel Karl (1,283). Tesla Model X noted 593 registrations (1,908 YTD).Jaguar I-PACE had only 21 new registrations last month (59 YTD), which means it must be still production-constrained.Sales of high-end, expensive electric cars are expected to remain high till the end of the year, as many customers intend to make a purchase before higher taxes are applied:Current BEV BIK tax: 4% for full priceFrom January 1, 2019: 4% tax will be applied only to the amount of up to €50,000. The amount above €50,000 will be taxed 22%Source: RAI Vereniging Alternative Fuel Vehicles To Outsell Diesel In Netherlands In 2018 Netherlands Now #1 Market In Europe For Tesla Model S Watch As Jaguar I-PACE Visits Amsterdam Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 2, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

News Chevy eCOPO Camaro is a NineSecond Drag Car Powered by Sunshine

first_imgSource: Electric, Hybrid, Clean Diesel & High-MPG Vehicles Answering the Question: How Fast Can an Electric Camaro GoIn some ways, it’s quite unfortunate that automotive manufacturers are first, and foremost, a business. As Elon Musk has recently been discovering, a manufacturer can’t keep making what it wants to make, it has to make what its customers want to buy. Because of this, most exciting concept cars are left at just that: a concept. As in a ‘We could make this cool car, if we thought anyone would buy it” car.At this year’s SEMA Show in Las Vegas, however, Chevrolet debuted a car that does not appear to have been created for Mr. Ben Franklin—the Chevrolet eCOPO Cmaaro.The eCOPO Camaro can light ’em upThe car in question is based on the recent, limited edition, drag-strip-ready COPO Camaro; which Chevy debuted earlier this year. The one they brought to SEMA, however, ditched the seven-liter V8 for a pair of electric motors with a claimed power rating of more than 700 horsepower and 600 pounds-feet of torque.What makes the eCOPO (yes, another brilliantly creative EV name) so interesting, is how Chevy went about creating it. Unlike most other EVs of the moment, the two BorgWarner electric motors put their power through a traditional Chevy Turbo 400 automatic transmission and light up the rear tires through an “old school” solid rear axle.Crate EV Motors?Similarly, the batteries–of which there are four 200-volt modules–are located around the original structure of the car; two replace the back seats and two are in the trunk. This means that what Chevy has created with their eCOPO could be the beginnings of the first EV crate motors.Ready to have some electric funWhat’s exciting about this way of building EVs is that, potentially, any car could be converted to run on wind and solar power. Currently, if you love your 1995 M5, but also love the idea of EVs, you’re a bit out of luck. What Chevy could be providing is the ability to update any car that has wheels and a transmission that can handle massive electric torque. For those who are worried that EVs will kill the world of performance modification, this could be the answer.Equally as exciting, those of you who can count may have realized that the battery pack of the eCOPO totals 800-volts; double what most current EVs have. This higher voltage battery (which should also be featured in some upcoming Porsche models as well) allows for much faster battery recharge. In fact, charge times could drop to as little as 10-15 minutes.Total range for the eCOPO, and other technical specs have not been officially released yet, but as long as it can go more than a quarter-mile between charges, who really cares?The post News: Chevy eCOPO Camaro is a Nine-Second Drag Car Powered by Sunshine appeared first on Clean Fleet Report.last_img read more

Mini Wont Follow Smarts AllElectric Path Yet

first_img World Debut: Mini Electric Concept Live At Frankfurt Motor Show Detailed EPA Ratings For Mini Countryman PHEV Reveal Electric Range Of Just 12 Miles Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 6, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News The BMW Group brand plans to keep internal combustion engines while introducing electrified options.The future of Mini has been put under a microscope of late as political events and consumer tastes have conspired to squash the British brand’s sales in recent years. But there’s hope coming early next year in the form of the first general production electric Mini. Does that mean Mini’s future is electric?More Mini News Not entirely, according to BMW Group Board Member Peter Schwarzenbauer, who told Automotive News Europe that Mini will still offer internal combustion engines for the foreseeable future. Despite the Mini Cooper SE’s launch in early 2020 and an EV platform joint venture with Great Wall Motors in China, Schwarzenbauer said Mini would offer electric options with all of the brand’s models going forward. But he stopped short of saying Mini would be come an all-electric brand like Daimler’s Smart plans to do now that it’s been partnered with Geely.While Mini is new to plug-ins for the public, Schwarzenbauer says he’s encouraged by the Countryman PHEV‘s 13 percent share of that model, which doesn’t sound that great but, hey, it’s a start. Mini is different than Smart in that it has to please fans of the John Cooper Works models that probably only feel right if they have an energetic turbocharged engine under the bonnet. Its larger models such as the Countryman and Clubman may continue on a BMW-based EV platform as Schwarzenbauer says some electric Minis will use a BMW-developed platform.In the short term, Mini has bigger problems. It has to figure out how to get an SUV-leaning public interested in its small cars again. And the uncertainty of the Brexit outcome has caused some serious nail-biting in both Oxford and Munich. But going forward, Mini may have to embrace some more electric options or risk being overshadowed by new upstarts like Polestar – or even the BMW i cars. Source: Electric Vehicle News Check Out Newly Revealed Retro Electric Mini Cooperlast_img read more

Plotter Prescott on course with Arts

first_imgHorse racing Share on Twitter Ron Cox Share on Messenger Share on Facebook Since you’re here… Share via Email Share on WhatsApp First published on Wed 1 Oct 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Twitter Even by his own high standards when it comes to guiding horses through the handicap ranks, Sir Mark Prescott is rather taken aback by the remarkable progress shown by his six-times winner Master Of Arts this year. Having started his unbeaten winning run off a rating of 58, the gelding will run off 104 in Saturday’s Cambridgeshire at Newmarket. “It is unusual to see one improve that much,” says the trainer, “but that is probably the limit of it.” Prescott also runs Caravel in the big handicap and is not surprised by the recent run of money for the four-year-old, from 20-1 down to as low as 12-1 in places. “There isn’t much between the two of them,” says Prescott. “Based on what they do at home, I would expect Master Of Arts to finish just in front. Whether that is good enough to be first and second on Saturday, or eighth and ninth, I don’t know.” Prescott certainly knew in 1997, when Pasternak and Rudimental completed a famous 1-2 for the stable in the race, the winner landing a huge public gamble. “They reproduced their gallops form to the pound,” recalls Prescott, who first won the race with Quinlan Terry in 1988 and was on target again with Chivalry five years ago. “Chivarly is the one I am most proud of, as he is the only horse in the history of the race to win without a prep run.” In fact Chivalry had not run for 343 days, so it should not deter backers that neither Master Of Arts nor Caravel has been out since July. “It was always the plan to give them a break,” says their meticulous trainer. “Master Of Arts would ideally prefer some give in the ground, but Caravel goes on a fast surface. Nothing went right for him on his last run at Goodwood, where Seb [Sanders] put up overweight.” With his stable jockey sidelined, Prescott has called on Darryll Holland to ride Master Of Arts. “He won on him once when Seb was unavailable,” says the trainer. “J-P Guillambert will chop off a leg to do 8st5lb on Caravel.” Prescott’s runners will have to contend with fast ground on Saturday, according to fellow Newmarket trainer, Chris Wall, who runs the fancied Premio Loco, cut to 9-1 from 11-1 by Hill’s. “I’ve just walked the track this morning and can’t find very much good about it. I’d say it’s pretty firm,” said Wall yesterday. Wall may be the man to halt Richard Hannon’s tremendous run of success in valuable sales races at Newmarket today. Hannon, who followed up Penny’s Gift’s win at Ascot last Friday with a lucrative double at The Curragh on Sunday, runs Appraisal and Ballyalla in the £250,000 Tattersalls Stakes. The Wall-trained Pyrrha (2.35) is best excused her run in a Group 3 race at Ascot, where she was twice badly hampered. She was well backed for that event on the strength of a stylish win at Newbury. The Newmarket stewards did not escape criticism in the British Horseracing Authority’s full reasons, published yesterday, for the disciplinary panel’s inquiry into team tactics in the International Stakes. “The matter could and should have been better handled atNewmarket,” reported the panel, who handed down seven-day bans to jockeys Johnny Murtagh and Colm O’Donoghue and fined Aidan O’Brien, the trainer of Duke of Marmalade, £5,000. Horse racing Reuse this content Wed 1 Oct 2008 19.01 EDT … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Plotter Prescott on course with Arts Shares00 Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Topics Share on Pinterest Support The Guardianlast_img read more

Benítez ends standoff and signs until 2014

first_img@domfifield news Benítez ends stand-off and signs until 2014 Shares00 Topics Rafael Benítez’s protracted stand-off with Liverpool’s American owners, Tom Hicks and George Gillett, was resolved last night when the club’s manager of almost five years finally signed a contract extension that will keep him at Anfield until 2014.The Spaniard has extended his current deal, which was due to run until the end of next season, by a further four years after five months of stuttering and occasionally acrimonious negotiations. Benítez, whose team trails Manchester United at the top of the Premier League by four points after last weekend’s 4-1 success at Old Trafford, vowed to “help create a new chapter” in the club’s glittering history and, with the uncertainty over his future apparently resolved, will resume Liverpool’s pursuit of a first league title since 1990.”My heart is with Liverpool, so I’m delighted to sign this new deal,” said Benítez, whose reign has yielded a European Cup and an FA Cup.”I love the club, the fans and the city, and with a club like this and supporters like this, I could never say no to staying. I always made clear I wanted to be here for a long time, and when I complete my new contract it will mean I have spent over a decade in Liverpool. The club is greatly respected around the world due to its incredible history and tremendous heritage. It is my aim to uphold those values and help create a new chapter in our history. Throughout this process, I would like to thank the owners for their hard work in finalising the deal. All of us at the club want the same thing, which is to be ­successful by winning major trophies.”Resolution was only reached on negotiations after five months of painstaking talks between the Spaniard’s lawyers and the owners. Benítez rejected an initial deal in January, prompting numerous re-drafts of the details of a prospective contract. While he has been forced to compromise on certain aspects of his demands, the settlement reached yesterday does represent something of a triumph for a manager who, at one stage, had appeared destined to leave Merseyside in the summer, with Real Madrid and Milan, attracted by his track record at Anfield and Valencia, touted as potential destinations.The 48-year-old has long been at loggerheads with the chief executive, Rick Parry, who is due to leave Anfield at the end of the current campaign, and had demanded more control over future transfer spending having seen his interest in his target last summer, the Aston Villa midfielder Gareth Barry, come to nothing. He has achieved that control to a large extent under the terms of his contract extension, although he will still have to work under a chief executive when Parry’s successor is appointed.It is understood he will also have a greater influence in the running of the club’s academy in Kirkby, having long expressed his frustration at the dearth of youngsters deemed capable of holding down a first-team place.”It is wonderful news that Rafa has made a long-term commitment to the football club,” said the club’s co-owner Hicks. “Since he became manager in 2004, he has been responsible for the great progress we have made. I know he will continue to build on his achievements as he has a tremendous hunger and desire to bring more success to the club – success our fans and everyone connected with the club deserves.”It is unclear how another of Benítez’s concerns – that he should be able to secure a release from his contract should, in the event of a takeover, he not see eye to eye with any new owners – has been resolved, though it seems inconceivable that any prospective purchasers of the club would seek to dismiss him.Benítez’s stock has risen again in the past week. The 4-0 thrashing of Real Madrid in the Champions League propelled Liverpool to the quarter-final stage of the competition for the fourth time in five seasons under Benítez, with the victory at United reviving hope that the title might be claimed this season.”With Rafa continuing to manage the team, we can look forward to more great football and success on the pitch,” added the co-owner Gillett. “He has special abilities and qualities which are admired here at the club and around the world. Coming after our excellent wins over Real Madrid and Manchester United, this gives us great momentum going into the final stages of the season.” Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Rafael Benítez First published on Wed 18 Mar 2009 20.01 EDT Share on LinkedIn Share via Email Share via Email This article is more than 10 years old Dominic Fifieldcenter_img Liverpool manager Rafael Benítez. Photograph: Denis Doyle/Getty Images This article is more than 10 years old • Liverpool manager agrees four-year extension• New deal gives Spaniard greater control at Anfield Share on Facebook Liverpool Rafael Benítez Share on Twitter Wed 18 Mar 2009 20.01 EDT Premier League Share on Pinterest Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Market Talk – May 24 2019

first_imgASIA / AUSTRALIA:China is accusing the U.S. of seeking to take over and capture global business. However, Beijing stated today that they are committed to striking a deal with the U.S., even with pressure against Chinese company Huawei. The Chinese Ambassador to the U.S. is asking for a balanced approach to the trade deal, stating that the U.S. is “changing their position.” He also dismissed allegations of military ownership of Huawei.President Trump departed for a visit to Japan today to honor the new emperor and to meet with PM Abe.The major Asian stock markets had a mixed day today. Shanghai increased 0.48 points or 0.02% to 2,852.99; KOSPI decreased 14.28 points or -0.69% to 2,045.31; ASX 200 decreased 35.80 points or -0.55% to 6,456.00; NIKKEI 225 decreased 33.92 points or -0.16% to 21,117.22; Hang Seng increased 86.80 points or 0.32% to 27,353.93; and SENSEX increased 623.33 points or 1.61% to 39,434.72.The major Asian currency markets had a mixed day today. AUDUSD increased 0.0025 or 0.36% to 0.6924 NZDUSD increased 0.0036 or 0.56% to 0.6553; USDJPY decreased 0.2380 or 0.22% to 109.3520; and USDCNY decreased 0.0104 or 0.15% to 6.9153.Gold increased 1.35USD/t oz. or 0.11% to 1,286.80 and silver decreased 0.015 USD/t. oz or -0.10% to 14.5836.Some economic news:New Zealand:Exports (Apr) decreased from 5.60B to 5.55BImports (Apr) increased from 4.78B to 5.11BTrade Balance (YoY) (Apr) increased from -5,710M to -5,480MTrade Balance (MoM) (Apr) decreased from 824M to 433MJapan:National Core CPI (YoY) (Apr) increased from 0.8% to 0.9%National CPI (MoM) increased from 0.0% to 0.1%National CPI (YoY) (Apr) increased from 0.5% to 0.9%All Industries Activity Index (MoM) decreased from -0.2% to -0.4%Singapore:GDP (QoQ) (Q1) increased from 2.0% to 3.8%GDP (YoY) (Q2) decreased from 1.3% to 1.2%Industrial Production (MoM) (Apr) increased from -2.5% to 2.4%Industrial Production (YoY) (Apr) increased from -4.3% to 0.1%India:Bank Loan Growth remain the same at 13.0%Deposit Growth increased from 9.7% to 10.4%FX Reserves, USD decreased from 420.06B to 418.00BEUROPE/ EMEA:In the UK, Theresa May (finally) submitted her resignation today. In a tearful message to the public, she stated, “I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honor of my life to hold.” Theresa May will forever be remembered as the PM that could not deliver on Brexit – in short, a disappointment. Her final attempt at a Brexit deal as well as a Conservative leadership contest were the final straws that broke the camel’s back. She never really had a hold of the parliament, and over the last few months their confidence in her was waning. The UK is set to go through the process of solidifying her replacement, but that is most likely not until the end of July. She will still be in power when U.S. President Trump will visit at the start of June.Europe is under pressure to review its border controls after it emerged that an individual sanctioned over his alleged role in Russia’s biggest tax fraud visited member states more than 70 times in the past four years.The U.S. has ordered 1,500 troops to the Middle East, which is a lower number than the original estimate of 15,000. President Trump mentioned that he does not expect a war, because if he did, he would have sent more than 1,500 troops.The major Europe stock markets had a green day today. CAC 40 increased 35.15 points or 0.67% to 5,316.51; FTSE 100 increased 46.69 points, or 0.65% to 7,277.73; and DAX increased 58.63 points or 0.49% to 12,011.04.The major Europe currency markets had a mixed day today. EURUSD increased 0.0030 or 0.27% to 1.1210; GBPUSD increased 0.0066 or 0.52% to 1.2720; and USDCHF decreased 0.0016 or 0.16% to 1.0015.Some economic news:Spain:Spanish PPI (YoY) decreased from 2.4% to 2.3%UK:Core Retail Sales (MoM) (Apr) decreased from 1.4% to -0.2%Core Retail Sales (YoY) (Apr) decreased from 6.3% to 4.9%Retail Sales (MoM) (Apr) decreased from 1.2% to 0.0%Retail Sales (YoY) (Apr) decreased from 6.7% to 5.2%CBI Distributive Trades Survey (May) decreased from 13 to -27U.S. / AMERICAS:The Trump administration plans to bailout farmers who have been hurt by tariffs – reportedly to the tune of $16 billion. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) predicts that the soybean market won’t see a recovery until 2024. In December, the USDA reported that the amount of soybeans in storage waiting to be sold hit a record high at 3.7 bushels. Although Trump alleges that China will ultimately pay for the bailout package, the money will most likely come from fees on U.S. imports that will then be passed on to the consumer.America’s beer industry has also been hurt by tariffs, albeit not necessarily on Chinese goods. Aluminum tariffs have caused costs to rise for beer manufacturers. According to a study by the National Beer Wholesalers Association, 40,000 jobs in the industry have been eliminated since 2016. Perhaps the recent decision to lift aluminum tariffs on Canada and Mexico through the restructured NAFTA deal will help to boost the industry.Meanwhile, Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD), one of Canada’s leading banks, reported better than expected quarterly earnings this week. “Earnings increased 7% to $3.3 billion and EPS rose 8% to $1.75, driven by record results in our Retail businesses and a rebound in Wholesale. We had good revenue growth in the quarter. Credit quality remains sound, and we continue to invest in building the bank of the future,” TD CEO Bharat Masrani announced during a shareholders meeting.Brazilian Economic Minister Paulo Guedes threatened to quit his position and leave the country if pension plans are not reformed. “I’ll get on a plane and I’ll live abroad. I’m old enough to retire,” Guedes told Veja magazine in a heated interview published on Friday. Guedes, along with other top Brazilian economists, predict that Brazil will be bankrupt by 2020 if major changes are not implemented. “If we do not reform, Brazil will catch fire. It will be chaos in the public sector,” he continued.Major US stock indices finished up green just before the long holiday weekend. The Dow gained 95.22 points or +0.37% to 25,585.69; the S&P 500 added 3.82 points or +0.14% to 2,826.06; the Nasdaq increased by 8.73 points or +0.11% to 7,637.01; and the Russell 2000 advanced 12.73 points or +0.85% to 1,514.11.U.S. markets will be closed on Monday in observance of Memorial Day. We thank the men and women who serve America.The Canadian markets closed the last day of the week in positive territory as well. The TSX Composite rose 65.43 points or +0.40% to 16,230.04, and the TSX 60 rose 4.17 points or +0.43% to 973.60.In Brazil, the Bovespa declined -282.23 points this Friday (-0.30%) to 93,627.80.ENERGY:Crude oil rebounded slightly after a large dip in yesterday’s trading. Concerns over global growth is putting downward pressure on the Crude oil price.The oil markets had a green day today: Crude Oil increased 0.64 USD/BBL or 1.11% to 58.5613; Brent increased 0.72 USD/BBL or 1.06% to 68.5968; Natural gas increased 0.018 USD/MMBtu or 0.70% to 2.6009; Gasoline increased 0.0086 USD/GAL or 0.45% to 1.9186; and Heating oil increased 0.0046 USD/GAL or 0.23% to 1.9695.Top commodity gainers: Feeder Cattle (5.49%), Wheat (3.35%), Corn (3.01%), and Ethanol (2.89%). Top commodity losers: Bitumen (-4.14%), Lean Hogs (-3.35%), Coal (-0.73%), and Coffee (-0.37%)The above data was collected around 13:54 EST on Friday.BONDS:Japan -0.06%(+0bp), US 2’s 2.17% (+1bps), US 10’s 2.33%(-5bps), US 30’s 2.75%(-7bps), Bunds -0.12% (-4bp), France 0.29% (+0bp), Italy 2.57% (-18bp), Turkey 19.06% (+1bp), Greece 3.39% (-61bp), Portugal 0.99% (-5bp), Spain 0.83% (-5bp) and UK Gilts 0.95% (-10bp). Market Talk – May 28, 2019 » Categories: Market Talk center_img « Market Talk – May 23, 2019 last_img read more

Clinical trial tests natural treatment to provide longterm solution for chronic eczema

first_imgApr 30 2018Eczema is the most common skin disease worldwide. People suffering from it often deal with a lifetime of painful symptoms. A new clinical trial is testing a natural treatment that researchers hope will provide a long-term solution for those dealing with the dry, itchy and painful skin that comes with chronic eczema. The trial uses a cream containing beneficial bacteria to fight harmful bacteria on the skin. While it may seem counterintuitive to treat bacteria with more bacteria, experts say this approach seeks to restore the natural microbial balance of healthy skin.”There are over 1,000 species of bacteria that all live in balance on healthy skin, some that even produce natural antibiotics. However, we know that eczema patients lack the beneficial bacteria needed to kill Staph aureus, harmful bacteria that can worsen eczema,” said Donald Leung, MD, head of the Division of Pediatric Allergy & Immunology at National Jewish Health.To fight harmful bacteria, researchers isolate beneficial bacteria from our skin and grow it in a lab. It is then applied to eczema patients’ skin as a lotion twice a day for a week. Bacterial DNA from patients’ skin is then analyzed in a lab to determine if the cream effectively reduced the amount of bad bacteria present.”Ideally, we want to eliminate all staph aureus from the skin of eczema patients,” said Leung. “What the cream does is help the skin gain back its natural balance and create that barrier needed to keep it healthy.”Researchers hope that using the bacteria-infused cream will offer a long-term solution where other treatments fall short. Powerful antibiotics are commonly prescribed for eczema, but they kill good bacteria on patients’ skin along with the bad. Creams containing corticosteroids are also often prescribed to eczema patients, but they come with harsh side effects, and patients usually can’t tolerate them for long periods of time.Related StoriesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they work’Scissors’ component of CRISPR/Cas9 sometimes gets stuckNew research could help design algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicals”The worst symptom of eczema is the itching and the scratching, and the more you scratch, the more it spreads. It can be very painful,” said Cassandra Rodriguez, 33, who has struggled with eczema all her life.Cassandra has tried just about every cream and medication on the market, and says when she learned about the clinical trial, she was on board to give it a try.”The trial coordinator explained that it’s like a probiotic for your skin,” said Rodriguez. “You hear all these things about good bacteria for your gut, so it seemed like a promising idea to apply that same concept to the skin.”Cassandra’s son also has eczema, and she’s hoping this research will lead to an effective treatment so that he won’t have to suffer with the pain and embarrassment of the disease for as long as she has. “He’s little now, but dealing with eczema as a teen and an adult is really difficult,” said Rodriguez. “If there were something on the market that could help him and help everyone suffering with eczema every day, that would be amazing.”Experts say there is more research to be done, but that the goal of the trial is to discover the best combination of bacteria to clear eczema from the skin and then make it available to patients as a prescription cream. The next steps involve testing those different combinations, ensuring they’re safe and conducting a longer trial to see if the benefits of bacterial cream can truly provide a permanent solution for eczema patients.​ Source:https://www.nationaljewish.org/last_img read more

Single blood sample can provide adequate confirmation of diabetes

first_img Source:https://www.jhsph.edu/ Jun 19 2018The study, published June 19 in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found evidence that a positive result for two standard diabetes markers in a single blood sample is a highly accurate predictor of diabetes and of major diabetes complications such as kidney disease and heart disease.About 25 million Americans have type 2 diabetes, which involves a failure of the body’s normal regulation of sugar (glucose) levels in the blood. The resulting chronic elevation of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) increases the risk of other major illnesses including heart disease, eye disease, kidney disease, and stroke.Current clinical guidelines recommend that an initial blood test result indicating elevated fasting levels of glucose or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) be confirmed at a second doctor’s visit with another blood test-;a time-consuming and relatively expensive practice that may lead to missed diagnoses.”The results of our study suggest that the two tests from one blood sample can provide adequate confirmation of diabetes, potentially allowing a major simplification of current clinical practice guidelines,” says study lead author Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Bloomberg School.Although diabetes is treatable, researchers estimate that roughly three million Americans who have it are undiagnosed. It also is thought that tens of millions of adults unknowingly have a borderline condition, “prediabetes,” that similarly increases risks of heart disease and other complications, and can easily lead to full-blown diabetes if uncorrected.Selvin and her colleagues hypothesized that positive results for both glucose and HbA1c in one blood sample might be an acceptable alternative to the current two-sample standard.”Doctors are already doing these tests together-;if a patient is obese, for example, and has other risk factors for diabetes, the physician is likely to order tests for both glucose and HbA1c from a single blood sample,” Selvin says. “It’s just that the guidelines don’t clearly let you use the tests from that one blood sample to make the initial diabetes diagnosis.”Related StoriesObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplantNew biomaterial could encapsulate and protect implanted insulin-producing cellsDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustTo determine how well the new approach would be likely to work, Selvin and colleagues examined data from a long-running Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study of the health of more than 13,000 Americans. The study, begun in the late 1980s, was designed to find risk factors for atherosclerosis, a major underlying feature of heart disease and stroke, but in tracking the overall health of participants for decades it has gathered data relevant to diabetes, including blood glucose and HbA1c test results.The researchers identified 383 people who, at their second study checkup in the early 1990s, did not have a diabetes diagnosis but did have positive results for both blood glucose and HbA1c from a single blood sample. Almost all-;90 percent-;went on to be diagnosed with diabetes during the first 15 years of the study (99 percent by 20 years). These individuals also developed diabetes complications, such as heart disease, at much higher rates than individuals who did not have diabetes or who only had one elevated test result.”The bottom line is that this combination of positive results from a single blood sample has a very high positive predictive value for a subsequent diagnosis of diabetes, and also indicates a high risk of typical diabetes complications,” Selvin says.Some people in the study who had positive results on only one test went on to be diagnosed with diabetes. Thus, Selvin emphasizes that for people with a single positive test, a repeat test in accordance with current guidelines is still appropriate.Even so, the study findings could lead to changes in the guidelines to make it possible for diabetes to be diagnosed more quickly based on the two positive results in one blood sample.”I’m hoping that these results will lead to a change in the clinical guidelines when they are revised in early 2019, which could make identifying diabetes a lot more efficient in many cases,” Selvin says.last_img read more

Findings questioned when clinical trials get a closer look

first_imgClinical trials rarely get a second look—and when they do, their findings are not always what the authors originally reported. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which compared how 37 studies that had been reanalyzed measured up to the original. In 13 cases, the reanalysis came to a different outcome—a finding that suggests many clinical trials may not be accurately reporting the effect of a new drug or intervention.To conduct the study, published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Shanil Ebrahim, a clinical epidemiologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, and colleagues combed through the MEDLINE database. The online archive contains almost all life sciences and biomedical research studies conducted over the past 64 years. The team found 37 clinical trials that been reanalyzed. Of these, 13 came to conclusions at odds with the original authors’ findings. Moreover, only five of the reanalyses were by an entirely different set of authors, which means they did not get a neutral relook.In one of the trials, which examined the efficacy of the drug methotrexate in treating systemic sclerosis—an autoimmune disease that causes scarring of the skin and internal organs—the original researchers found the drug to be not much more effective than the placebo, as they reported in a 2001 paper. However, in a 2009 reanalysis of the same trial, another group of researchers including one of the original authors used Bayesian analysis, a statistical technique to overcome the shortcomings of small data sets that plague clinical trials of rare diseases such as sclerosis. The reanalysis found that the drug was, as it turned out, more effective than the placebo and had a good chance of benefiting sclerosis patients. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img In another study, researchers reanalyzed a 1984 clinical trial of sclerotherapy, in which a drug is injected to treat dilated veins in the esophagus. The original researchers found that the therapy reduced mortality but did not reduce the risk of bleeding recurring at a later time. Based on this finding, they recommended sclerotherapy to patients. In 2001, however, another group of researchers analyzed the same data with a different statistical method that looked at the interplay between recurring bleeding and mortality, and concluded that sclerotherapy did not reduce mortality. Their findings imply that doctors ought to avoid prescribing sclerotherapy in patients with high risk of mortality, in contrast with the original conclusion. Sclerotherapy is still commonly used for the treatment of hemorrhoids and varicose veins.Other reanalyses found faults with the original methodology. For example, in a study of the efficacy of mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) versus manual CPR in patients suffering cardiac arrest outside hospitals, one of the hospitals participating in the trial changed its protocols midway. This altered the trial outcome in favor of manual CPR, a flaw that the reanalysis corrected. The authors of this reanalysis belonged to the same research group as the original study.“It was alarming that a substantial portion of trials arrived at different conclusions,” Ebrahim says. Although the reanalyses didn’t always mean the original research was flawed, the altered conclusions indicate a greater need for the sharing of clinical trial data, he says.Tom Jefferson, a Rome-based researcher who reviews studies for the nonprofit Cochrane Collaboration, says the results of the JAMA study do not surprise him. “The process [of analyzing clinical trials] is so subjective, you can twist it any way you want.” He notes that drug companies often do not release all-important raw data from clinical trials, instead choosing to publish highly compressed summaries of their findings.Last year, the Cochrane Collaboration succeeded in a 4-year battle with Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche to access raw data from unpublished clinical trials on its influenza drug Tamiflu. Governments across the world had stockpiled the drug to guard against a flu epidemic, after clinical trials found the drug to be effective in the disease. But during a reanalysis of these trials, the Cochrane Collaboration discovered that the raw data underlying several of the published studies had not been released. When it was eventually able to access these data several years later, a reanalysis showed that Tamiflu wasn’t as effective as thought earlier. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Video Infrared movies capture hummingbirds shedding heat in flight

first_imgHummingbirds are impressive flyers, managing 12 meters and 50 wingbeats per second. But all that flapping could put them in danger of overheating. Research published online today in Royal Society Open Science shows that they use their unfeathered regions, particularly their feet and eyes, to regulate body temperature during flight. Scientists used infrared thermal imaging to measure heat dissipation from calliope hummingbirds (Selasphorus calliope) flying in a wind tunnel (shown above). They identified hotspots under the wings, on the feet, and around the eyes, which were at least 8°C warmer than the rest of the body. The birds rely on different hot spots to regulate body temperature when flying at different speeds. Hummingbirds actually find it hardest to maintain a constant temperature when flying slowly, because there is less airflow to keep them cool. At lower speeds, they trebled the size of their eye hot spot and dangled their feet below their bodies to maximize heat loss. The researchers estimated the birds’ heat budget, and found that at speeds of 0 m/s to 12 m/s, they lost enough heat from these hot spots to maintain a safe body temperature. But they note the challenge of keeping cool may become harder as the climate warms.last_img read more

New method grows sperm in a dish

first_imgSeveral labs have tried to create sperm in a dish from stem cells derived from early embryos, because they can differentiate into any kind of cell in the body. But the multistage process of meiosis, which involves a complex pairing up and separation of a cell’s DNA, “always seems to peter out as you approach the later stages,” Geijsen says. In 2011, a research group at Kyoto University in Japan working with mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells managed to turn them into cells that resemble primordial germ cells (PGCs), from which sperm and eggs arise. But to complete their maturation into sperm, which have half the number of chromosomes of nongerm cells, these PGC-like cells were transplanted back into mouse testes. That meant that biologists couldn’t observe all of meiosis—and that any future clinical application would require returning cells to a man’s body, which could cause tumors.In the new study, led by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing and Nanjing Medical University in China and published today in Cell Stem Cell, no transplantation was necessary. The team first used the Kyoto University group’s approach to make PGC-like cells from mouse ES cells. They then combined these in a dish with testicular cells from newborn mice in various culture conditions—a process that took hundreds of trials, says author Xiao-Yang Zhao, a stem cell biologist now at Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China. They finally landed on a cocktail of sex hormones and growth factors that includes a hormone-rich extract from the pituitary glands of cows. “God knows what’s in there,” says reproductive biologist Mary Ann Handel of the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, “but it’s probably good stuff.” Under those conditions, the cells go through a division process that has “all the hallmarks of meiosis,” says Handel, who helped develop a set of standards for documenting that process in a dish. The researchers then injected the resulting spermlike cells—which couldn’t swim—directly into eggs and implanted them in surrogate mouse mothers. “The final gold standard: They make babies!” Handel says.By observing complete sperm development in vitro, researchers can tackle some fundamental questions. What triggers meiosis? How do surrounding cells in the testes direct that process? And how do a cell’s chromosomes manage to pair up and separate during division?The clinical applications are much more remote, because mouse and human germs cells develop differently and may require different conditions. Still, the proof-of-concept is encouraging: “If it works in the mouse, there’s no biological reason to think it wouldn’t be effective in humans,” says stem cell researcher George Daley of Harvard Medical School in Boston. “But one has to actually define the [culture] conditions and walk the cells through this very careful choreography.”Others are more skeptical about the results. “You have to be very cautious about the implications of this paper,” says stem cell biologist Mitinori Saitou, who led the Kyoto University team that first created PGC-like cells. He says several details in the paper struck him as strange: The cells were reportedly cultured at 37°C—about 3°C hotter than is typical, and potentially hot enough to hinder sperm development. He also notes that the fluorescence imaging meant to demonstrate the presence of PGC-like cells in the dish doesn’t seem to show proteins necessary for that type of cell, meaning the authors may not really have created the PGC-like cells they would need to generate sperm.Zhao contends that the protein expression is consistent with PGC-like cells, and that the team observed similar results at 34°C and 37°C. But many in the field will be waiting for the next steps: testing whether the resulting mouse pups are genetically normal, trying out the technique in other animals, and using other and less controversial types of cells—such as stem cells that can be extracted and cryopreserved from adult testicular tissue—as the starting point. Zhao says his group plans to further optimize the culture conditions and eventually attempt to repeat the feat with human cells. How the male body produces sperm has long been hidden inside its genitalia. Trying to recreate the process in a lab for humans and other mammals has led to many failures; sperm development appeared to be dependent on unique conditions in the testes. But a new technique may finally be bringing that process into the open: A team of Chinese researchers reports turning a dish of a certain type of mouse stem cell into spermlike cells, which then were used to fertilize eggs and produce healthy mouse pups. The approach could help researchers study mammalian sperm development more directly, and it could spur efforts to develop treatments for male infertility in people.“It is, I think, truly the first time any lab has been able to go all the way up to a live pup in vitro,” says Niels Geijsen, a stem cell biologist at the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands, “which is quite amazing, if this is indeed what happened.” The dramatic result—from a relatively straightforward approach—comes after years of unsuccessful or incomplete attempts, and it leaves some researchers wary about whether it can be replicated.If it can, the technique offers researchers their first full glimpse of mammalian meiosis, the process by which cells in the testes and ovaries become sperm and eggs. And if a similar technique could produce human sperm cells, “the impact would be huge,” says Kyle Orwig, a stem cell biologist focused on male infertility treatments at the Magee-Womens Research Institute at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania. The advance would be particularly relevant to men with certain types of infertility—for example, those who become unable to produce functional sperm after chemotherapy. These men could still conceive biological children if other cells from their bodies are reprogrammed into stem cells and then prompted to develop into sperm. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

First hard look at Zika pregnancies finds nearly half result in miscarriage

first_imgPatricia Brasil, an infectious disease researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, and her colleagues began by studying 345 pregnant women who experienced a rash—a telltale symptom of Zika infection—between September 2015 and May. Of that group,182 tested positive for Zika virus. By July, the team had data on 125 Zika-infected women and their babies and 61 women who had given birth after the rash but had not tested positive for Zika.The results were sobering. Among women infected in the first trimester, 55% experienced what the researchers called “adverse outcomes.” That included miscarriage, calcifications in a baby’s brain (a sign of abnormal brain development), babies being born overall much smaller than normal, and brain hemorrhages. Among women infected in the second trimester, 51% experienced such adverse outcomes. Overall, such serious problems affected 58 of the 125 infected women, or 46%. Among women who did not test positive for Zika virus, seven, or 11.5%, had adverse outcomes. The updated paper describes four cases of microcephaly among the 125 infected women, or 3.4%.And 46% may not be the whole story, says Karin Nielsen-Saines of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, who helped to coordinate the study. The data published this week include observations during babies’ first 3 months of life. Other researchers have reported that Zika-affected babies that seem normal at birth can still have brain damage that becomes apparent later. The paper notes that several infants who had no obvious problems at first had abnormal MRI brain scans and should be followed closely. “Some babies are damaged invisibly at birth, and as they’re supposed to develop the problems will emerge,” Nielsen-Saines says. The team has tried to collect brain imaging of as many babies as it can.The news is grim for regions affected by the virus, she concludes. “It’s sobering. The chances of someone having an abnormal outcome are high.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country New data from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, suggest that nearly half of women infected with Zika virus during pregnancy experience a serious complication, whether a miscarriage or significant birth defect, in their baby. The data are the first to quantify the risks to women infected at different times during pregnancy, and they seem to confirm that they are highest early in pregnancy. But the study also finds significant problems among women infected just a few weeks before giving birth. Microcephaly is the best known birth defect, but those dramatic cases represent only a small proportion of children damaged by the virus.The study is relatively small—researchers in Brazil followed just 125 infected women—but it is the first to report pregnancy outcomes from women conclusively known to have the virus. Only such cohort studies are able to determine how high the risk of birth defects and other problems is for infected pregnant women and their babies, says Maria Van Kerkhove, an epidemiologist at the Pasteur Institute in Paris who wasn’t involved in the study. The results are crucial for being able to counsel expectant mothers, she says.The data, presented online today in The New England Journal of Medicine, are a follow-up to a preliminary report published in March. That study found that among women infected in the third trimester, 29% developed complications that affected their babies. The new data describe outcomes for women infected earlier in pregnancy, who in March had not yet given birth.last_img read more

Everything you ever wanted to know about perovskite Earths most abundant type

first_imgEverything you ever wanted to know about perovskite, Earth’s most abundant type of mineral—that we almost never see Perovskite is one of the most common crystal structures on the planet, but why is it so interesting to researchers from many scientific disciplines? Science looks into the properties of this odd cube of atoms, and what cutting-edge research is being performed on its many varieties. By Andrew WagnerNov. 17, 2017 , 4:30 PMlast_img

New NSF rules on sexual harassment leave many questions unanswered

first_img National Science Foundation Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe One new section requires the institution to tell the agency if it has determined that the principal investigator (PI) or co-PI of an NSF grant has committed sexual harassment. The other says that an institution must inform NSF if it puts a PI or co-PI on administrative leave in response to an allegation of harassment, even if an investigation is not complete.The proposal highlights the legal complexity—and institutional sensitivity—of the issue. Federal funding agencies have traditionally addressed sexual harassment in academia under the gender equity provisions—known as Title IX—of a 1972 education law. That law gives the federal government the ability to withhold funds and impose other sanctions on institutions found in violation of its terms.Historically, NSF has not investigated specific allegations of sexual harassment made by individuals. Instead, it has referred harassment cases to the Department of Education. (In contrast, NSF investigates allegations of scientific misconduct through its Office of Inspector General. But harassment is not part of the federal definition of misconduct, although the American Geophysical Union has recently expanded its definition to include harassment.)Even so, NSF has some leverage over universities. It requires all institutions receiving NSF funding to certify that they are complying with Title IX. NSF also conducts so-called compliance reviews of a subset of institutions to make sure their gender equity practices are up to snuff, and it can target an institution for further scrutiny if it sees evidence of widespread gender discrimination.Confusion and uncertaintyLast month, NSF Director France Córdova admitted that the agency sometimes learns about sexual harassment charges involving NSF-funded researchers through the media, saying “that’s a pretty poor way to find out.” And a recent case involving an NSF-funded researcher at Boston University (BU) highlighted the uncertainties surrounding its current approach to handling harassment issues.Last November, BU found geologist David Marchant had sexually harassed a former graduate student during a field expedition in Antarctica from 1999 to 2000, and placed him on paid administrative leave while he appealed the university’s decision. But confusion immediately arose at both the university and NSF around the question of whether Marchant could remain as the PI for an NSF grant, according to emails made public last week by the science committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, which has been examining the case. The National Science Foundation (NSF) in Alexandria, Virginia, hopes that its new policy on sexual harassment will spur universities to deal more aggressively with the pervasive problem. But the additional reporting requirements, which will be officially published Monday in the Federal Register, are far from a definitive statement about how NSF plans to deal with this complex and sensitive subject.The carefully worded notice, for example, doesn’t address whether a scientist found guilty of sexual harassment should automatically be removed from a grant. And it would not require universities to tell NSF when they launch investigations into allegations of harassment.The eight-page notice in the Federal Register is designed to flesh out and seek public comment on an “important notice” that NSF issued on 8 February. It proposes adding two new components to the “terms and conditions” that universities and other institutions agree to follow when they accept an NSF award. (Grants are awarded to institutions, not individuals, although scientists invariably refer to “my grant.”) [W]e know there’s still a lot of heavy work to pull off in the arena of sexual harassment. By Jeffrey MervisMar. 3, 2018 , 9:45 AM New NSF rules on sexual harassment leave many questions unanswered Headquarters of the National Science Foundation in Alexandria, Virginia Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Rhonda Davis, National Science Foundation In early December, according to the emails, BU officials asked NSF “to confirm” its view that Marchant couldn’t continue as PI while he was on leave. The university said it wanted to retain the grant, with a different PI, to support the work of a graduate student. On 18 December 2017, an NSF program officer wrote back that “there is no NSF policy that supports [your] statement” regarding Marchant’s removal, adding that NSF’s grants and contracts division believed “this is an internal BU issue.”Five weeks later, BU informed NSF that it had “decided to keep [Marchant] as the PI pending further developments.” BU’s email noted that Marchant “is providing mentorship to a graduate student on the project” and that the university believed “no formal notification to NSF is required at this time.”A few days later, however, the NSF program officer reversed course. Citing “clarification from NSF upper management,” the officer wrote that BU is “required to appoint a substitute PI … without delay.” BU immediately chose another faculty member in the department, and NSF approved the change. (Last week, BU denied Marchant’s appeal to keep his job.)“We want to know”NSF officials say the new reporting requirements are intended to eliminate such miscommunication, as well as help NSF better monitor its grantees. “We want to know about it” if a university has placed someone on administrative leave because of a matter involving alleged sexual harassment, says Rhonda Davis, head of NSF’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion. “We don’t care if it’s a finding of sexual harassment or if they are still carrying out the investigation.” In either case, she notes, the development “changes the terms and conditions of the grant,” so NSF should be notified.The new rules only address when NSF should be notified, however, not the broader issue of how instances of sexual harassment should be handled by either the university or NSF. For example, Davis says, a university is not required to inform NSF at the time it opens a sexual harassment investigation of a PI on an NSF grant. Nor must it remove an NSF-funded PI if that person is put on administrative leave.One reason for the ambiguity, Davis says, is the wide variation in the meaning of “administrative leave.” At some institutions, administrative leave means that a faculty member is banned from campus. That step, in all likelihood, would make it impossible for them to carry out their NSF-funded research project, requiring the installation of a new PI. But at another university, Davis says, a faculty member on administrative leave might retain access to research facilities, or even be allowed to interact with students under appropriate supervision. In those cases, she explains, their altered status might not affect their ability to carry out the research.Another significant unknown is exactly how NSF will respond to a grantee who is found to have committed sexual harassment. Davis demurred when asked whether the new policy means a harasser should automatically be removed as a PI. “Our response would be based on what the person has done,” she replied. “Sexual harassment is not OK. But there have been cases where an institution took action commensurate with what the person did—although we’d prefer that it hadn’t happened at all—and the PI experienced some serious consequences that were sufficient to change their behavior.”At the same time, Davis says the new rules reinforce NSF’s duty to be a responsible steward of tax dollars. “It makes clear that universities don’t make the call [on whether a PI can remain on a grant], we make the call,” she says.Not the last wordDavis emphasizes that the new notice is far from NSF’s last word on sexual harassment. To date, she says, an internal NSF task force has focused “on things that we felt we could act on very quickly, and avoided things that require a heavier lift. Now we’re ready to move to the second and third phases,” which could include making PIs found guilty of sexual harassment subject to some of NSF’s most severe penalties, including so-called debarment, which bans researchers from seeking federal grants for some period of time. “That’s a serious conversation,” Davis says, “and we know there’s still a lot of heavy work to pull off in the arena of sexual harassment.”The new policy is part of a series of steps NSF is taking to stay abreast of developments relating to sexual harassment in academia. For example, Davis says a new website provides “one-stop shopping” for those seeking information. The site is still “a work in progress,” she notes, and there are plans to install a secure mechanism for individuals to file a complaint.Her office also now has someone with extensive experience investigating Title IX complaints, she says. And it has the resources to query universities about individual cases of harassment that NSF learns about from the media or from an informal communication. “We want to do more than simply check the boxes” when such cases come up, she says, describing plans to use such interventions as a “mini–compliance review.”Other voices will soon be weighing in on how federal agencies should address sexual harassment in academia. A study by a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine—funded in part by NSF—is expected out this summer. And the chairman and top Democrat of the House science committee have asked the Governmental Accountability Office (GAO) to examine the ability of five major federal research agencies, including NSF, to ensure that their grantees comply with Title IX. The legislators also want to know how the agencies deal with alleged sexual harassment by grantees in situations not covered by Title IX. The GAO study is expected to get underway this summer.In the meantime, NSF will be accepting comments on its proposed reporting requirements through early May.last_img read more

Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your body

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Simply telling people they had a gene that lowers exercise ability made them perform worse on a treadmill. By Jocelyn KaiserDec. 10, 2018 , 3:05 PM iStock.com/BraunS Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email If you want to win a race or stick to a difficult diet, coaches of all kinds will tell you it’s all about “mind over matter.” But that advice rarely crosses over into the medical community, where an inborn ability—or risk—is thought to depend more on genes and environment than on mindset. Now, in a study examining what may be a novel form of the placebo response, psychologists have found that just telling a person they have a high or low genetic risk for certain physical traits can influence how their body functions when exercising or eating, regardless of what genetic variant they actually have.The results could be an eye-opener for medical providers and consumer DNA testing companies. “From a psychological science perspective, it’s not terribly surprising that genetic risk information can function this way,” says behavioral researcher Susan Persky of the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, who was not involved in the study. But it’s a novel idea in the genetics community, she adds.After getting ethics approval to conduct an experiment that involved deceiving participants, graduate student Bradley Turnwald and co-workers in the lab of psychologist Alia Crum at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, recruited 116 young and middle-aged people for what they called a “personalized medicine study.” They tested each for a gene variant that influences a person’s capacity for exercise. The volunteers also took a treadmill test. Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your body A week later, the participants were given a result, based not on their actual data, but rather on one of two groups into which they had been randomly placed. Some were told they had the form of a gene called CREB1 that makes a person tire easily; others were told they had the high-endurance version. Then they ran on the treadmill again.This time, those who had been told they had the low-endurance version of CREB1 did worse on the test, even if they had the other variant. Compared with their results on the first test, on average their bodies removed toxic carbon dioxide less efficiently, their lung capacity dropped, and they stopped running 22 seconds sooner, the team reports today in Nature Human Behavior. And those who thought they had the high-endurance form of the CREB1 gene ran slightly longer on average before feeling hot and tired, regardless of what gene variant they had. “Simply giving people this information changed their physiology,” Turnwald says.The team also tested a second group of 107 people for its version of FTO, a gene that influences how full we feel after eating. Some versions can also predispose people to obesity. Participants ate a small meal and rated their fullness. After being told, at random, that they had a version of FTO that made them hungrier than average or one that made them easily sated, participants ate the same meal. Those told they had the “hungry” version of the gene didn’t feel any different. But those who were told they had the other version felt less hungry on average after eating; they also had higher blood levels of a hormone that indicates a feeling of fullness.In the cases of both genes, some of the changes in bodily reactions were larger than what the researchers measured between people who actually carried different versions of the genes, suggesting their attitude could change their risk as much or more than their genetics. “What people haven’t fully appreciated is that that information also puts you into a mindset: ‘I’m at high risk or I’m protected,’” Crum says. “And that alone can have potent effects on physiology and motivation.”Such a placebo response to genetic information could have serious implications for genetic testing, especially commercially available products that can reveal risk scores for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. The Stanford team says people shouldn’t necessarily stop getting tested. But they—along with medical providers and genetic counselors—should keep in mind that just knowing about risk can subtly influence outcomes. The results suggest that if a person just thinks they are at high risk for, say, obesity, it could change their physiology in a way that makes them more prone to the condition, Turnwald says.The next question is whether these effects fade quickly, or last for years.last_img read more

Chicago Judge Unseals Jussie Smolletts Case

first_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Jussie Smollett can’t get Chicago off his back. Officers who covered up police shooting unarmed Black teenagers have had less heat on them.Although all charges have dropped against the “Empire” actor and the file was sealed, a judge has decided to unseal the file.See Also: Complete Timeline Of Jussie Smollett InvestigationThe Chicago Tribune reports that the news media have been hungry to get a hold of the case file, which his lawyers have fought. However, Circuit Judge Steven Watkins claims because Smollett and his attorneys spoke to the media, the records should be public. Smollett has maintained his innocence.SEE ALSO:Kamala Harris Leads Senate To Finally Passing Anti-Lynching BillWTH? ‘Black Panther’ Writer Roxane Gay Was Not Invited To The Movie PremiereCan Racial Profiling Be Stopped? A Federal Jury Sides With The Louisiana State Police Twitter Reacts To Sen. Kamala Harris Announcing Her Run For President He read the 10-page ruling that he read aloud correct, “These are not the actions of a person seeking to maintain his privacy or simply be let alone. While the court appreciates that (Smollett) was in the public eye before the events that precipitated this case, it was not necessary for him to address this so publicly and to such an extent. By doing so, the court cannot credit his privacy interest as good cause to keep the case records sealed.”What’s interesting is that after the charges were dropped, Smollett has not done any interviews or posted on social media. The Chicago Police Department and former Mayor Rahm Emanuel have spoken to countless media outlets.Nonetheless, nothing was revealed in the court docs. The Chicago Tribune says, “In the end, however, little new was revealed… the majority of the 192-page file consisted of the media’s motions objecting to the sealing of the file in the first place.” However, it may not be over. There is still a request for the records of Kim Foxx, the Cook County State Attorney.On Jan. 29, while walking to a subway, Smollett claimed two men yelled racial and homophobic slurs at him, investigators told The Hollywood Reporter. They allegedly punched and poured bleach on him while one of the suspects put a rope around his neck. As they fled the scene, Smollett told police they said, “This is MAGA country.”The city of Chicago is suing Smollett for a half a million dollars. Foxx has also been attacked by the Chicago Police and is calling for a probe into the 16 felony counts being dropped. She has also said she is receiving death threats.center_img More By NewsOne Staff Chicago Police Department , Hate Crime , Homophobic , Jussie Smollett , MAGA , racist attack Senate Policy Luncheons Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Wife of Joshua Francis refiles divorce petition

first_imgShareTweetSharePinJoshua Francis faces a new divorce petition just days after the first one was withdrawnThe wife of Joshua Francis has refiled a divorce petition against her husband mere days after she withdrew a first one that had been filed.According to the court documents which were filed, Hedda Dyer-Francis, the Petitioner claims that on the 26th October, 2017 the Respondent (Francis) had “a mental breakdown or psychiatric episode which placed her in further morbid fear for her safety and that of the minor children.”She claims that Francis’ unstable mental condition makes him “a danger to her and the minor children.”Dyer-Francis, in her documents, said that acting out of concern for the Respondent, she did make the necessary arrangements for the Respondent to receive psychiatric attention overseas.“The Petitioner has been placed in such grave and acute fear for her life and safety and the life and safety of the minor children that on 27th October, 2017 she had no option but to accept the very first opportunity for a job offer out of Dominica,” she said.Dyer-Francis is also asking the court for maintenance for their two children since she now resides in Barbados and the children are attending school in that country.When contacted, Francis who is a lawyer by profession, denied all the allegations contained in the petition and expressed shock that the documents are being circulated and he is yet to be served.“I am shocked to see those things contained in the documents that I am yet to be served and it is being circulated on social media…I love my wife and children and will never abuse her,” he said.He has vowed to vigorously defend his name and also challenge the statements in the petition.Lennox Lawrence is representing Hedda Dyer-Francis in the matter.last_img read more

Gold worth Rs 27 cr seized in Hyderabad

first_img NRI techie dies during adventure sport at resort in Telangana Related News Advertising Centre nod to drilling, Telangana forest officer says won’t let anyone in Written by Sreenivas Janyala | Hyderabad | Published: July 4, 2019 4:08:45 am 0 Comment(s) hyderabad airport, hyderabad police, hyderabad airport gold seized, india news Police are questioning two agents who were suspected to be waiting for the 14 passengers, said officials. (Express archive photo)Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI) officials and a team of Hyderabad’s South Zone Task Force on Wednesday uncovered a smuggling racket after intercepting 14 passengers returning from the Umrah pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia with 6.46 kg of gold, worth Rs 2.17 crore, at the Rajiv Gandhi International Airport. Based on a tip-off, passengers who arrived on a Saudi Airlines flight from Jeddah were searched, said a DRI official. “The 14 passengers are residents of Hyderabad. Each of them was found to be carrying Foreign Marked Gold in the form of cut pieces, 24 carat bracelets and chains…” said the official.“The modus operandi is that some agents pay for the trip for people who want to go to Umrah with the condition that while returning, they carry back gold handed over to them at Jeddah by other agents. If they come out without getting caught, local agents collect the gold from them. They are blackmailed by agents at Jeddah if they refuse to act as per the instructions of agents,” the official said.Police are questioning two agents who were suspected to be waiting for the 14 passengers, said officials. Take 5: ‘People stuck in jams get frustrated… a majority of IT sector follows our advisories’ last_img read more

Opposition says no to mango diplomacy in Bihar Assembly Rabri calls govt

first_img Advertising By Express News Service |Patna | Published: July 4, 2019 7:46:50 am While Rabri called the government “insensitive” for distributing mangoes to legislators at a time when children had been dying due to AES, senior Congress leader Prem Chandra Mishra called the “mango diplomacy unfortunate and a way to digress the Opposition’s attention from AES deaths”.As baskets and saplings were brought inside the House by the agriculture department for distribution, Rabri told the media outside the Assembly: “The Opposition would not accept mango basket and plants. How could legislators accept mangoes at a time when so many children have died because of AES. It is so insensitive on part of the state government to have come up with this idea.”Senior Congress leader Prem Chandra Mishra said: “How can the state government think of mango diplomacy in these crucial times when the state government needed to come out with a definite plan of action to prevent AES deaths in future?” However, senior JD(U) leader and minister Shyam Rajak said: “The government has been only trying to create awareness on environment with the move. But the Opposition has started seeing politics in it.”Earlier, Bihar health minister Mangal Pandey had said the government had taken all necessary steps to tackle the issue of AES. AES toll 10 in Assam, Centre rushes team bihar aes, bihar aes deaths, bihar aes children deaths, bihar children deaths, rabri devi, encephalitis, Opposition led by Rabri Devi refused the state government’s offer to distribute a basket of mangoes to each legislator. (File/Express Photo By Prashant Ravi)Even as the Bihar Assembly discussed the issue of deaths of children due to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) in the ongoing session, the Opposition led by former CM and RJD legislature party leader Rabri Devi on Wednesday refused the state government’s offer to distribute a basket of mangoes with two mango plants to each legislator. Related News Nitish Kumar calls Bihar AES deaths ‘unfortunate,’ says expressing grief not enough Have taken all possible steps to prevent spread of AES: Bihar to Supreme Court 1 Comment(s)last_img read more