New chair for Lloyds TSB Foundation for England and Wales

first_imgNew chair for Lloyds TSB Foundation for England and Wales  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis With an income of £24 million in 2003, the independent Lloyds TSB Foundation for England and Wales gives grants to underfunded charities that work to improve the lives of people in local communities, especially those who are disadvantaged and disabled. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Management Recruitment / peoplecenter_img Professor Robert Boyd will succeed Joanna Foster CBE as Chair of the Lloyds TSB Foundation for England and Wales, with effect from November 2003.Professor Body has been Principal of St. George’s Hospital Medical School since 1996, Pro Vice- Chancellor for Medicine at the University of London from 2000, and was previously a Consultant Children’s doctor for 30 years.Joanna Foster CBE has served as Chair of the Foundation since 1997 and in accordance with the Foundation’s policy on corporate governance, stands down in November after the maximum of six years in post. Advertisement Howard Lake | 23 May 2003 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Premier League reveal latest decision on offside rule amid VAR row

first_img Loading… The Premier League are not set to change the way VAR works for tight offside calls for the rest of this season. VAR has proved controversial with fans during its first campaign in the Premier League mainly due to marginal offside decisions – with five close ‘armpit’ calls during the most recent weekend of action. Wolves , Brighton , Norwich, Crystal Palace and Sheffield United all had goals chalked off by the review system which looked level with the naked eye. “There should not be a lot of time spent to find something marginal. “If something is not clear on the first sight, then it’s not obvious and it shouldn’t be considered. “Looking at one camera angle is one thing but looking at 15, trying to find something that was potentially not even there, this was not the idea of VAR. It should be clear and obvious.” Former Premier League referees Mark Clattenburg and Dermot Gallagher have both given different opinions of VAR. “The excitement and spirit of the game is in danger of being damaged by the precise nature of the VAR technology when it comes to offside,” Clattenburg wrote in a column for The Daily Mail . “So why not go back to assistant referees flagging for offside and we stick to their decision?” Gallagher added on Sky Sports: “We know that the system is not 100 per cent, nothing ever is, but the system is the best available. The International Football Association Board (IFAB), which makes the game’s laws, claims VAR should only overturn blatant errors rather than forensically examine replays looking for potential offsides. IFAB are set to issue guidance to leagues during their annual meeting in February. The Premier League are not set to change the way VAR works for tight offside calls for the rest of this season. VAR has proved controversial with fans during its first campaign in the Premier League mainly due to marginal offside decisions – with five close ‘armpit’ calls during the most recent weekend of action. Wolves , Brighton , Norwich, Crystal Palace and Sheffield United all had goals chalked off by the review system which looked level with the naked eye. The International Football Association Board (IFAB), which makes the game’s laws, claims VAR should only overturn blatant errors rather than forensically examine replays looking for potential offsides. IFAB are set to issue guidance to leagues during their annual meeting in February. But according to the Daily Mail, the Premier League have no plans to alter the way VAR makes offside decisions – with the report claiming that the league think changing the rules halfway through a season would ‘affect the integrity of the competition’. “Clear and obvious still remains — it’s an important principle,” said IFAB general secretary Lukas Brud.center_img Promoted ContentHow They Made Little Simba Look So Lifelike in ‘The Lion King’Top 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowIs This The Most Delicious Food In The World?10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better8 Things To Expect If An Asteroid Hits Our PlanetThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Art6 Most Handsome Indian Actors6 Most Breathtaking Bridges In The World Read Also: Team of the decade: Guardiola explains why Man City toppled Liverpool “It may be that when IFAB have their meeting, they could tweak something because they take notice of what people say and the Premier League do the same. “We have to remember that they have already said it will take a few years to get it right. It will take time and there could be a few bumps in the road – this may be one of the biggest bumps. “But it’s not going to be the same product for the entirety. It will be an on-going thing and people will cascade ideas down.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

    Archives

    Categories

    Meta

    Tags